Research Guidelines and Tips

 
Sheep, Charles W. Howard household, Puyallup, WA, c. 1940. Detail from gelatin-silver print.

Sheep, Charles W. Howard household, Puyallup, WA, c. 1940. Detail from gelatin-silver print.

Information Sharing Considerations

Genealogical and other human-scale research, by its nature, collects and synthesizes personal details. In an age where identity theft is a serious problem, it's important to consider the impact of sharing your research on living individuals as well as the rights of other researchers, writers, and publishers. In my research, I make every attempt to adhere to the guidelines recommended by the National Genealogical Society. I've also set some personal policies for posting and sharing information from and about individuals, which you'll find in the policy sheet linked below.

 
William Edward Howard (center top) and three unidentified individuals, likely Stanton, Neb., c. 1894. 

William Edward Howard (center top) and three unidentified individuals, likely Stanton, Neb., c. 1894. 

Scanning Photographs and Negatives

The ability to easily share old family pictures is one of the joys of the Internet age—and can help ensure that the history incorporated in these images is preserved for the future. The National Archives and Record Administration's Guidelines for Digitizing Archival Materials for Electronic Access is a great source for expert opinion on best practices for archival scanning. I couldn't resist providing my own thoughts on the matter as well, in the PDF that's available below.